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Image from page 212 of “A short manual of analytical chemistry, qualitative and quantitative,–inorganic and organic” (1891)

A few mil nice Air Force Cartoon images I found:

Image from page 212 of “A short manual of analytical chemistry, qualitative and quantitative,–inorganic and organic” (1891)

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Identifier: cu31924002971533
Title: A short manual of analytical chemistry, qualitative and quantitative,–inorganic and organic
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: Muter, John
Subjects: Chemistry, Analytic
Publisher: Philadelphia, P. Blakiston’s Son & Co.

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e figure. Bypouring a few drops of water into the open end of this tube a column of waterseveral centimetres high in both limbs of the tube is obtained. This servesas a manometer, and enables the operator to know when the pressure of thegas equals the atmospheric pressure. To secure a uniform temperature, thebulbs a and b are surrounded by water contained in a glass vessel. Thisvessel for holding water is merely an inverted bottle of clear glass from whichthe bottom has been removed. The handle of the stopcock d passes througha rubber stopper in the neck of the bottle. A thermometer graduated to °is placed in the water near the bulb a. The whole apparatus is supportedupon a vertical wooden stand. The absorption pipette b consists of two nearly spherical glass bulbs ofabout 300 c.c. capacity. They communicate at the bottom by means of aglass tube, 3 m.m. inside diameter, f is a two-way stopcock. The holes inthe key are drilled at right angles, so that the tube which connects with the

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Fig. 51. measuring apparatus may be put in communication either with the funnel orwith the absorption bulb. The funnel is of service in removing air from thetube which connects the measuring apparatus with the absorption pipette. Bypouring mercury or water into the funnel and turning the stopcocks ^ and c inthe proper directions all the air is readily removed, /is a rubber pump usedin transferring gas from b to a. The lower part of the pipette containsmercury, which protects the reagent from the action of the air. To measure the volume of a gas, the vessel a is filled completely with puremercury. This is easily accomplished by pouring the mercury into b, and then,after turning c until a communicates with the outside air, forcing it into a bymeans of the pump e. Any excess of mercury in b is then allowed to flow outthrough the stopcock d. When a and b are now placed into communicationthe mercury will flow from a to b, and gas will be drawn in through the stop-cock c. The volume of merc

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Image from page 19 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)

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Identifier: belltelephonevol21mag00amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]

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WARNING DISTRICT CENTER ®3 NFORMATIONCENTER OperationsBoard ^ Operotions Officers Civil Air RaidWarning Switchboard -4 CIVILIAN ACTION Other Information CentersAir FieldsInterceptor Plones in FlightAir Corps HeodqVrsOther HeodqtVsArmy, Navy, Coast GuardAnti-Aircraft Stations , To Other District Control Centers To Other WarnirjgDistrict Centers LOCAL CONTROLCENTER

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CIVILAfR DEFENSE Alarms Defense Organizations Civil Institutions: Hospitals, Schools,etc.Police and Fire Depts.UtilitiesRailroadsManufacturing Plants DAMAGE CONTROLRescue, Medical ond Decontominotion Services, Highway, Police and Fire Department$,Utilities Telephone Lines and Air Defense Only the upper portion of this diagram represents military activity. The lower part shows how the telephone serves Civilian Defense as well 19^2 Telephone Lines and Air Defense scheme. It has been brought intoexistence because, instead of necessi-tating a constant patrol in the air, itis an effective method of interceptionwhile conserving the air forces avail-able. 1 HIS plan of air defense was not de-vised over night. The idea of the ci-vilian ground observer system wasconceived a decade ago, and has beentried out, with the cooperation ofthe telephone companies, in succes-sive maneuvers since its inception.Early experiments were crude, buteach test brought improvements andrefinements.* Today, upon th

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Image from page 338 of “Essentials of United States history” (1906)

Some mil cool Army Store Cartoon images:

Image from page 338 of “Essentials of United States history” (1906)

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Identifier: essentialsofunit00mowr
Title: Essentials of United States history
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Mowry, William A. (William Augustus), 1829-1917 Mowry, Blanche Swett, Mrs., 1870-
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Boston [etc.] Silver, Burdett and company

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ing the battle was on once more,And Sheridan twenty miles away. He dashed down the line, mid a storm of huzzas, And the wave of retreat checked its course there because The sight of the master compelled it to pause. With foam and with dust the black charger was gray ; By the flash of his eye, and the red nostrils play, He seemed to the whole great army to say : I have brought you Sheridan all the way From Winchester down to save the day. LINCOLNS FIRST ADMINISTRATION (1861-1865) 305 preparing to move against Sherman when, by a special orderfrom President Davis, he was removed from the commandand General Hood put in his place. The Union officers werenot displeased by this change. Their hope of success wasgreater than before and the courage of the entire Unionarmy was strengthened. Sherman cut off completely Hoodsline of supplies. Then nothing could prevent the fall ofAtlanta. The city was evacuated on the 2d of September,1864. Shermans policy through his entire march was to K E N T-Tfc

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ATLANTICOCEAN SCALE OF MILES Shermans Campaign in Georgia. weaken the South and destroy, so far as possible, suppliesfor the army. Accordingly he here destroyed foundries,mills, and manufactories. 394. Shermans Success. — Sherman had now been fourmonths on his campaign. He had fought ten pitched bat-tles and many minor engagements. He had lost, in killed andwounded, thirty thousand men. He had, however, inflictedheavy losses upon the Confederate forces and had destroyedgreat quantities of army stores. At Atlanta and other 306 ESSENTIALS OF EXITED STATES HISTORY towns in Georgia there had been large manufacturing es-tablishments, which had furnished the Confederates withwagons, harnesses, clothing, and various sorts of militarynecessities. Sherman had also cut off these sources ofsupplies. 395. Hood invades Tennessee. — By orders from Rich-mond, Hood made an unexpected move. He left Shermanand turned his entire force towards Nashville. The Unionarmy had thus far received its suppli

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Image from page 337 of “Essentials of United States history” (1911)

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Identifier: essentialsofunit00mow
Title: Essentials of United States history
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Mowry, William Augustus, 1829- [from old catalog] Mowry, Blanche (Swett), Mrs., 1870- [from old catalog] joint author
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Boston [etc.] Silver, Burdett and company

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roar,Telling the battle was on once more,And Sheridan twenty miles away. He dashed doAm the line, mid a storm of huzzas. And the wave of retreat checked its course there because The sight of the master compelled it to pause. With foam and with dust the lilack charger was gray ; By the flash of his eye, and the red nostrils play, He seemed to the whole great army to say : I have brought you Sheridan all the way From Winchester down to save the day. LINCOLNS FIRST ADMINISTRATION (1861-1865) 305 preparing to move against Siierman when, by a special orderfrom President Davis, he was removed from the commandand General Hood put in his place. The Union officers werenot displeased by this change. Their hope of success wasgreater than before and the courage of the entire Unionarmy was strengthened. Sherman cut off completely Hoodshne of supplies. Then nothing could prevent the fall ofAtlanta. The city was evacuated on the 2d of September,1864. Shermans policy through his entire march was to

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Shermans Campaign in Geokgia. weaken the South and destroy, so far as possible, suppliesfor the army. Accordingly he here destroyed foundries,mills, and manufactories. 394. Shermans Success. — Sherman had now been fourmonths on his campaign. He had fought ten pitched bat-tles and many minor engagements. He had lost, in killed andwounded, twenty thousand men. He had, however, inflictedheavy losses upon the Confederate forces and had destroyedgre^t cjuantities of army stores. At Atlanta and other 306 ESSENTIALS OF UNITED STATES HISTORY towns in Georgia there had been large manufacturing es-tabhshnients, which had furnished the Confederates withwagons, harnesses, clothing, and various sorts of militarynecessities. Sherman had also cut off these sources ofsupplies. 395. Hood invades Tennessee. — By orders from Rich-mond, Hood made an unexpected move. He left Shermanand turned his entire force towards Nashville. The Unionarmy had thus far received its supplies from Tennessee overa sing

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Image from page 26 of “Caricature politique au Canada = Free lance political caricature in Canada” (1904)

Some mil cool US Army Cartoon images:

Image from page 26 of “Caricature politique au Canada = Free lance political caricature in Canada” (1904)

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Identifier: caricaturepoliti00ryan
Title: Caricature politique au Canada = Free lance political caricature in Canada
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: Ryan, Alonzo
Subjects: Caricatures et dessins humoristiques Caricatures and cartoons
Publisher: Montréal : A.T. Chapman

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ROSS STILL HANGS ON OUR ARMY AND NAVY thcY are net mucli to look at, but they are a wonder for theirsl«e. FkKK LANCB CARICATURE. 31 XX 3 co

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cd (A CdC c .2*E Ô esC 0) ao ô S»)la oi-i o a 3 o In Cd «4-N C ^N 3O ao X *-* > îi T3 ^ « « i> 3 .110) *+- ■> 3 C – il o > ap ao n utpq

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Image from page 25 of “Caricature politique au Canada = Free lance political caricature in Canada” (1904)

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Identifier: caricaturepoliti00ryan
Title: Caricature politique au Canada = Free lance political caricature in Canada
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: Ryan, Alonzo
Subjects: Caricatures et dessins humoristiques Caricatures and cartoons
Publisher: Montréal : A.T. Chapman

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Notre Armée et Notre Marine Blies nont pas lair formidables, mais ellessont vraiment surprenantes pour leur taille

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ROSS STILL HANGS ON OUR ARMY AND NAVY thcY are net mucli to look at, but they are a wonder for theirsl«e. FkKK LANCB CARICATURE. 31 XX 3 co

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Image from page 7 of “Their glory cannot fade, Christmas nineteen-eighteen” (1918)

Check out mil these Air Force Cartoon images:

Image from page 7 of “Their glory cannot fade, Christmas nineteen-eighteen” (1918)

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Identifier: theirglorycannot00unse
Title: Their glory cannot fade, Christmas nineteen-eighteen
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Armed forces
Publisher: Montreal, Canadian Pacific Railway

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(5) LIEUTENANT (b) SECOND-LIEUTENANT Regimental badge worn at A. Field Officers on Staff wear one row of oak (or maple) leaves on peak of cap. 2-3, Cap and badge as in 1. 5-6, Cap and badge as in 4. 4, This cap has also come into use for Regimental Officers of higher rank. Staff Officers wear rank badges on shoulder straps, Field Officers on cuff. ROYAL AIR FORCE ^NOTE—The Royal Air Force, now a distinct fighting arm, is a consolidation of theRoyal Flying Corps and The Royal Naval Air Service. The uniforms of these twoservices are, however, still worn in many cases—R.F.C. being khaki and R.N.A.S.navy blue.)

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1st CLASS MECHANIC *

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Image from page 160 of “Medical and surgical reports” (1904)

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Identifier: medicalsurgicalr02stluuoft
Title: Medical and surgical reports
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: St. Luke’s Hospital, Chicago
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago

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the dilatation throws back-ward and causes to disappear tumors of the posterior stomach wall,of the lesser curvature, and of the pylorus, as well as tumors posteriorto the stomach, as of the pancreas, left kidney, or transverse meso-colon. We have had two cancers of the gastro-colic omentum whichwere well pushed forward by the dilatation; two tumors which werediagnosed as tuberculous omental tumors, but which disappearedwith the dilatation and were both found to be cancers of the posteriorgastric wall; three diagnosed to be in the enlarged left lobe of the liverbut found to disappear with the dilatation, and to be, one a cancer of DILATATION OF STOMACH AND COLON 107 the pancreas, and the other two cancers of the lesser curvature; andother tumors of similar import. The Location of the Site of Tenderness.—The same rules apply asin the location of a tumor. A patient complains of soreness in thestomach region. On palpation no tumor is felt, but there is a tender Lessee CiA*i/<Ltiufe

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Y(.d.%- &*l. Diagram after Gray and Quain illustrating the important organs immediatelyposterior to the stomach and colon. area; after dilatation the tenderness cannot be elicited except on verydeep palpation, and after the gas has disappeared from the stomach thetenderness returns. In such a case the tenderness must either be inthe posterior gastric wall, or behind the stomach. A few cases inwhich pain at the same spot resulted each time the stomach wasdilated, at intervals of several days, were thought to have chronic 108 ST. LUKES HOSPITAL REPORTS ulcer with adhesions, and in some there was a good ulcer history;but none of these cases have come to operation, to confirm or upset thediagnosis. Dilatation of the Colon.—To dilate the colon a soft rubberrectal tube is inserted about twelve inches and air forced through it bymeans of an atomizer bulb. The introduction of the tube is facilitatedif air is forced through it during its passage up the rectum. Dilatation of the colon, or

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