Archive for the ‘Gallery’ Category

Image from page 212 of “A short manual of analytical chemistry, qualitative and quantitative,–inorganic and organic” (1891)

A few mil nice Air Force Cartoon images I found:

Image from page 212 of “A short manual of analytical chemistry, qualitative and quantitative,–inorganic and organic” (1891)

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: cu31924002971533
Title: A short manual of analytical chemistry, qualitative and quantitative,–inorganic and organic
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: Muter, John
Subjects: Chemistry, Analytic
Publisher: Philadelphia, P. Blakiston’s Son & Co.

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
e figure. Bypouring a few drops of water into the open end of this tube a column of waterseveral centimetres high in both limbs of the tube is obtained. This servesas a manometer, and enables the operator to know when the pressure of thegas equals the atmospheric pressure. To secure a uniform temperature, thebulbs a and b are surrounded by water contained in a glass vessel. Thisvessel for holding water is merely an inverted bottle of clear glass from whichthe bottom has been removed. The handle of the stopcock d passes througha rubber stopper in the neck of the bottle. A thermometer graduated to °is placed in the water near the bulb a. The whole apparatus is supportedupon a vertical wooden stand. The absorption pipette b consists of two nearly spherical glass bulbs ofabout 300 c.c. capacity. They communicate at the bottom by means of aglass tube, 3 m.m. inside diameter, f is a two-way stopcock. The holes inthe key are drilled at right angles, so that the tube which connects with the

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 51. measuring apparatus may be put in communication either with the funnel orwith the absorption bulb. The funnel is of service in removing air from thetube which connects the measuring apparatus with the absorption pipette. Bypouring mercury or water into the funnel and turning the stopcocks ^ and c inthe proper directions all the air is readily removed, /is a rubber pump usedin transferring gas from b to a. The lower part of the pipette containsmercury, which protects the reagent from the action of the air. To measure the volume of a gas, the vessel a is filled completely with puremercury. This is easily accomplished by pouring the mercury into b, and then,after turning c until a communicates with the outside air, forcing it into a bymeans of the pump e. Any excess of mercury in b is then allowed to flow outthrough the stopcock d. When a and b are now placed into communicationthe mercury will flow from a to b, and gas will be drawn in through the stop-cock c. The volume of merc

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 19 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: belltelephonevol21mag00amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
WARNING DISTRICT CENTER ®3 NFORMATIONCENTER OperationsBoard ^ Operotions Officers Civil Air RaidWarning Switchboard -4 CIVILIAN ACTION Other Information CentersAir FieldsInterceptor Plones in FlightAir Corps HeodqVrsOther HeodqtVsArmy, Navy, Coast GuardAnti-Aircraft Stations , To Other District Control Centers To Other WarnirjgDistrict Centers LOCAL CONTROLCENTER

Text Appearing After Image:
CIVILAfR DEFENSE Alarms Defense Organizations Civil Institutions: Hospitals, Schools,etc.Police and Fire Depts.UtilitiesRailroadsManufacturing Plants DAMAGE CONTROLRescue, Medical ond Decontominotion Services, Highway, Police and Fire Department$,Utilities Telephone Lines and Air Defense Only the upper portion of this diagram represents military activity. The lower part shows how the telephone serves Civilian Defense as well 19^2 Telephone Lines and Air Defense scheme. It has been brought intoexistence because, instead of necessi-tating a constant patrol in the air, itis an effective method of interceptionwhile conserving the air forces avail-able. 1 HIS plan of air defense was not de-vised over night. The idea of the ci-vilian ground observer system wasconceived a decade ago, and has beentried out, with the cooperation ofthe telephone companies, in succes-sive maneuvers since its inception.Early experiments were crude, buteach test brought improvements andrefinements.* Today, upon th

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Comments Off on Image from page 212 of “A short manual of analytical chemistry, qualitative and quantitative,–inorganic and organic” (1891)

FanimeCon 2012 609

Some mil cool Military Anime images:

FanimeCon 2012 609
Military Anime
Image by coolmikeol

Vic Mignogna – Saboten-con 2009 (Day 2)
Military Anime
Image by Kataklizmic Design
Vic Mignogna, voice actor and musician

Comments Off on FanimeCon 2012 609

2011 Atlanta Fashion Police 492

A few mil nice Marines Cosplay images I found:

2011 Atlanta Fashion Police 492
Marines Cosplay
Image by Cliff Nordman

Marine & Alien pet
Marines Cosplay
Image by simononly

Marine & Alien pet
Marines Cosplay
Image by simononly

Comments Off on 2011 Atlanta Fashion Police 492

Winry Rockwell

A few mil nice Navy Cosplay images I found:

Winry Rockwell
Navy Cosplay
Image by greyloch
From the anime Full Metal Alchemist. Had a nice chat with her on a variety of subjects (cosplay, anime, military retirement – her husband is in the Navy, etc.). She was such a sweetheart. 🙂

Link & Navy
Navy Cosplay
Image by Ydolon
Link & Navy (from The Legend of Zelda) cosplayers at Anime North 2012.

Link & Navy
Navy Cosplay
Image by Ydolon
Link & Navy (from The Legend of Zelda) cosplayers at Anime North 2012.

Comments Off on Winry Rockwell

untitled-1301.jpg

Some mil cool Military Anime images:

untitled-1301.jpg
Military Anime
Image by wmamurphy

untitled-960-2.jpg
Military Anime
Image by wmamurphy

Armageddon Expo 2012
Military Anime
Image by geoftheref
armageddonexpo.com/nz/
Christchurch New Zealand

Comments Off on untitled-1301.jpg

Emma Frost

Some mil cool Air Force Cosplay images:

Emma Frost

Image by edwick
Tamyra E. as Emma Frost. Tamyra is a retired Air Force flight engineer who’s a Wounded Warrior Project alumnus. Hooyah!

Check out Toonzone News’ coverage of the 2011 New York Comic Con

Teddy

Image by dejahthoris
The cutest thing to ever wear the air force jacket.

Comments Off on Emma Frost

TOWER BRIDGE HDR

Some mil cool Air Force Anime images:

TOWER BRIDGE HDR

Image by k.kazantzoglou Life is full of surprises!!! 🙂
Tower Bridge (built 1886-1894) is a combined bascule and suspension bridge in London, England, over the River Thames. It is close to the Tower of London, from which it takes its name. It has become an iconic symbol of London.

The bridge consists of two towers tied together at the upper level by means of two horizontal walkways, designed to withstand the horizontal forces exerted by the suspended sections of the bridge on the landward sides of the towers. The vertical component of the forces in the suspended sections and the vertical reactions of the two walkways are carried by the two robust towers. The bascule pivots and operating machinery are housed in the base of each tower. The bridge’s present colour scheme dates from 1977, when it was painted red, white and blue for the Queen Elizabeth II’s silver jubilee. Originally it was painted a chocolate brown colour.[2]

Tower Bridge is sometimes mistakenly referred to as London Bridge,[3] which is the next bridge upstream.

The nearest London Underground station is Tower Hill on the Circle and District lines, and the nearest Docklands Light Railway station is Tower Gateway.[4]

History
[edit] Background
Elevation, with dimensions

In the second half of the 19th century, increased commercial development in the East End of London led to a requirement for a new river crossing downstream of London Bridge. A traditional fixed bridge could not be built because it would cut off access by tall-masted ships to the port facilities in the Pool of London, between London Bridge and the Tower of London.

A Special Bridge or Subway Committee was formed in 1876, chaired by Sir Albert Joseph Altman, to find a solution to the river crossing problem. It opened the design of the crossing to public competition. Over 50 designs were submitted, including one from civil engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette. The evaluation of the designs was surrounded by controversy, and it was not until 1884 that a design submitted by Sir Horace Jones, the City Architect (who was also one of the judges),[5] was approved.

Jones’ engineer, Sir John Wolfe Barry, devised the idea of a bascule bridge with two towers built on piers. The central span was split into two equal bascules or leaves, which could be raised to allow river traffic to pass. The two side-spans were suspension bridges, with the suspension rods anchored both at the abutments and through rods contained within the bridge’s upper walkways.
[edit] Construction
Tower Bridge under construction, 1892

Construction started in 1886 and took eight years with five major contractors – Sir John Jackson (foundations), Baron Armstrong (hydraulics), William Webster, Sir H.H. Bartlett, and Sir William Arrol & Co.[6] – and employed 432 construction workers. E W Crutwell was the resident engineer for the construction.[7]

Two massive piers, containing over 70,000 tons of concrete,[5] were sunk into the riverbed to support the construction. Over 11,000 tons of steel provided the framework for the towers and walkways.[5] This was then clad in Cornish granite and Portland stone, both to protect the underlying steelwork and to give the bridge a pleasing appearance.

Jones died in 1887 and George D. Stevenson took over the project.[5] Stevenson replaced Jones’s original brick façade with the more ornate Victorian Gothic style, which makes the bridge a distinctive landmark, and was intended to harmonise the bridge with the nearby Tower of London.[7] The total cost of construction was £1,184,000[7] (£100 million as of 2012).[8]
[edit] Opening

The bridge was officially opened on 30 June 1894 by The Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VII), and his wife, The Princess of Wales (Alexandra of Denmark).[9]

The bridge connected Iron Gate, on the north bank of the river, with Horselydown Lane, on the south – now known as Tower Bridge Approach and Tower Bridge Road, respectively.[7] Until the bridge was opened, the Tower Subway – 400 m to the west – was the shortest way to cross the river from Tower Hill to Tooley Street in Southwark. Opened in 1870, Tower Subway was the world’s first underground (‘tube’) railway, but closed after just three months and was re-opened as a pedestrian foot tunnel. Once Tower Bridge was open, the majority of foot traffic transferred to using the bridge, there being no toll to pay to use it. Having lost most of its income, the tunnel was closed in 1898.[10]

Tower Bridge is one of five London bridges now owned and maintained by the Bridge House Estates, a charitable trust overseen by the City of London Corporation. It is the only one of the Trust’s bridges not to connect the City of London to the Southwark bank, the northern landfall being in Tower Hamlets.
[edit] Design
Tower Bridge viewed from the top of London City Hall.
Oblique view of north tower from Tower Bridge Road.

The bridge is 800 feet (244 m) in length with two towers each 213 feet (65 m) high, built on piers. The central span of 200 feet (61 m) between the towers is split into two equal bascules or leaves, which can be raised to an angle of 83 degrees to allow river traffic to pass. The bascules, weighing over 1,000 tons each, are counterbalanced to minimise the force required and allow raising in five minutes.

The two side-spans are suspension bridges, each 270 feet (82 m) long, with the suspension rods anchored both at the abutments and through rods contained within the bridge’s upper walkways. The pedestrian walkways are 143 feet (44 m) above the river at high tide.[7]
[edit] Hydraulic system
One of the original steam engines: a 360 hp horizontal twin-tandem compound engine, fitted with Meyer expansion slide valves

The original raising mechanism was powered by pressurised water stored in several hydraulic accumulators.[11] The system was designed and installed by the self-effacing Hamilton Owen Rendel (born 1843)[12] while working for Sir W. G. Armstrong Mitchell & Company of Newcastle upon Tyne. Water, at a pressure of 750 psi, was pumped into the accumulators by two 360 hp stationary steam engines, each driving a force pump from its piston tail rod. The accumulators each comprise a 20-inch ram on which sits a very heavy weight to maintain the desired pressure.

In 1974, the original operating mechanism was largely replaced by a new electro-hydraulic drive system, designed by BHA Cromwell House. The only components of the original system still in use are the final pinions, which engage with the racks fitted to the bascules. These are driven by modern hydraulic motors and gearing, using oil rather than water as the hydraulic fluid.[13] Some of the original hydraulic machinery has been retained, although it is no longer in use. It is open to the public and forms the basis for the bridge’s museum, which resides in the old engine rooms on the south side of the bridge. The museum includes the steam engines, two of the accumulators and one of the hydraulic engines that moved the bascules, along with other related artefacts.
[edit] Third steam engine
The third engine in working order,
at Forncett Industrial Steam Museum

During World War II, as a precaution against the existing engines being damaged by enemy action, a third engine was installed in 1942:[14] a 150 hp horizontal cross-compound engine, built by Vickers Armstrong Ltd. at their Elswick works in Newcastle upon Tyne. It was fitted with a flywheel having a 9-foot (2.7 m) diameter and weighing 9 tons, and was governed to a speed of 30 rpm.[14] The engine became redundant when the rest of the system was modernised in 1974, and was donated to the Forncett Industrial Steam Museum by the Corporation of the City of London.[14]
[edit] Navigation control

To control the passage of river traffic through the bridge, a number of different rules and signals were employed. Daytime control was provided by red semaphore signals, mounted on small control cabins on either end of both bridge piers. At night, coloured lights were used, in either direction, on both piers: two red lights to show that the bridge was closed, and two green to show that it was open. In foggy weather, a gong was sounded as well.[7]

Vessels passing through the bridge had to display signals too: by day, a black ball at least 2 feet (0.61 m) in diameter was to be mounted high up where it could be seen; by night, two red lights in the same position. Foggy weather required repeated blasts from the ship’s steam whistle.[7]

If a black ball was suspended from the middle of each walkway (or a red light at night) this indicated that the bridge could not be opened. These signals were repeated about 1,000 yards (910 m) downstream, at Cherry Garden Pier, where boats needing to pass through the bridge had to hoist their signals/lights and sound their horn, as appropriate, to alert the Bridge Master.[7]

Some of the control mechanism for the signalling equipment has been preserved and may be seen working in the bridge’s museum.
[edit] Reaction

Although the bridge is an undoubted landmark, professional commentators in the early 20th century were critical of its aesthetics. "It represents the vice of tawdriness and pretentiousness, and of falsification of the actual facts of the structure", wrote H. H. Statham,[15] while Frank Brangwyn stated that "A more absurd structure than the Tower Bridge was never thrown across a strategic river".[16]

Architectural historian Dan Cruickshank selected the bridge as one of his four choices for the 2002 BBC television documentary series Britain’s Best Buildings.[17]
[edit] Mistaken identity

Tower Bridge is sometimes mistaken for London Bridge,[3] the next bridge upstream. A popular urban legend is that in 1968, Robert McCulloch, the purchaser of the old London Bridge that was later shipped to Lake Havasu City, Arizona, believed that he was in fact buying Tower Bridge. This was denied by McCulloch himself and has been debunked by Ivan Luckin, the vendor of the bridge.[18]
[edit] Traffic
Bridge open to admit a boat with a tall mast
Interior of high-level walkway (used as an exhibition space)

Road

Tower Bridge is still a busy and vital crossing of the Thames: it is crossed by over 40,000 people (motorists, cyclists and pedestrians) every day.[19] The bridge is on the London Inner Ring Road, and is on the eastern boundary of the London congestion charge zone. (Drivers do not incur a charge by crossing the bridge.)

In order to maintain the integrity of the historic structure, the City of London Corporation have imposed a 20 miles per hour (32 km/h) speed restriction, and an 18 tonne weight limit on vehicles using the bridge. A sophisticated camera system measures the speed of traffic crossing the bridge, utilising a number plate recognition system to send fixed penalty charges to speeding drivers.[20]

A second system monitors other vehicle parameters. Induction e.loops and piezoelectric detectors are used to measure the weight, the height of the chassis above ground level, and the number of axles for each vehicle.[20]

River

The bascules are raised around 1000 times a year.[21] River traffic is now much reduced, but it still takes priority over road traffic. Today, 24 hours’ notice is required before opening the bridge. There is no charge for vessels.

A computer system was installed in 2000 to control the raising and lowering of the bascules remotely. It proved unreliable, resulting in the bridge being stuck in the open or closed positions on several occasions during 2005 until its sensors were replaced.[19]
[edit] Tower Bridge Exhibition and the tower walkways

The high-level open air walkways between the towers gained an unpleasant reputation as a haunt for prostitutes and pickpockets; they were seldom used by regular pedestrians, as they were only accessible by flights of stairs and were closed in 1910. In 1982 they were reopened as part of the Tower Bridge Exhibition, an exhibition now housed in the bridge’s twin towers, the high-level walkways and the Victorian engine rooms. The exhibition charges an admissions fee. The walkways, which are now enclosed, boast stunning views of the River Thames and many famous London sites, serving as viewing galleries for over 380,000 tourists[citation needed] who visit each year. The exhibition also uses films, photos and interactive displays to explain why and how Tower Bridge was built. Visitors can access the original steam engines that once powered the bridge bascules, housed in a building close to the south end of the bridge.
[edit] 2008–2012 facelift

In April 2008 it was announced that the bridge would undergo a ‘facelift’ costing £4 million, and taking four years to complete. The work entailed stripping off the existing paint down to bare metal and repainting in blue and white. Each section was enshrouded in scaffolding and plastic sheeting to prevent the old paint from falling into the Thames and causing pollution. Starting in mid-2008, contractors worked on a quarter of the bridge at a time to minimise disruption, but some road closures were inevitable. It is intended that the completed work will stand for 25 years.[22]

The renovation of the walkway interior was completed in mid 2009. Within the walkways a versatile new lighting system has been installed, designed by Eleni Shiarlis, for when the walkways are in use for exhibitions or functions. The new system provides for both feature and atmospheric lighting, the latter using bespoke RGB LED luminares, designed to be concealed within the bridge superstructure and fixed without the need for drilling (these requirements as a result of the bridge’s Grade I status).[23]

The renovation of the four suspension chains was completed in March 2010 using a state-of-the-art coating system requiring up to six different layers of ‘paint’.[24]
[edit] Incidents
A Short Sunderland of No. 201 Squadron RAF moored at Tower Bridge during the 1956 commemoration of the Battle of Britain

In December 1952, the bridge opened while a number 78 double-decker bus (stock number RT 793, registration plate JXC 156) was crossing from the south bank. At that time, the gateman would ring a warning bell and close the gates when the bridge was clear before the watchman ordered the lift. The process failed while a relief watchman was on duty. The bus was near the edge of the south bascule when it started to rise; driver Albert Gunter (possibly Gunton) made a split-second decision to accelerate, clearing a 3 ft gap to drop 6 ft onto the north bascule, which had not yet started to rise. There were no serious injuries.[25][26]

The Hawker Hunter Tower Bridge incident occurred on 5 April 1968 when a Royal Air Force Hawker Hunter FGA.9 jet fighter from No. 1 Squadron, flown by Flt Lt Alan Pollock, flew through Tower Bridge. Unimpressed that senior staff were not going to celebrate the RAF’s 50th birthday with a fly-past, Pollock decided to do something himself. Without authorisation, Pollock flew the Hunter at low altitude down the Thames, past the Houses of Parliament, and continued on toward Tower Bridge. He flew the Hunter beneath the bridge’s walkway, remarking afterwards that it was an afterthought when he saw the bridge looming ahead of him. Pollock was placed under arrest upon landing, and discharged from the RAF on medical grounds without the chance to defend himself at a court martial.[27][28]

In summer 1973 a single-engined Beagle Pup was twice flown under the pedestrian walkway of Tower Bridge by 29-year-old stockbroker’s clerk Paul Martin. Martin was on bail following accusations of stockmarket fraud. He then ‘buzzed’ buildings in The City, before flying north towards the Lake District where he died when his aircraft crashed some two hours later.[29]

In May 1997,[30] the motorcade of United States President Bill Clinton was divided by the opening of the bridge. The Thames sailing barge Gladys, on her way to a gathering at St Katharine Docks, arrived on schedule and the bridge was duly opened for her. Returning from a Thames-side lunch at Le Pont de la Tour restaurant, with British Prime Minister Tony Blair, President Clinton was less punctual, and arrived just as the bridge was rising. The bridge opening split the motorcade in two, much to the consternation of security staff. A spokesman for Tower Bridge is quoted as saying, "We tried to contact the American Embassy, but they wouldn’t answer the phone."[31]

On 19 August 1999, Jef Smith, a Freeman of the City of London, drove a "herd" of two sheep across the bridge. He was exercising a claimed ancient permission, granted as a right to Freemen, to make a point about the powers of older citizens and the way in which their rights were being eroded.[32]

Before dawn on 31 October 2003, David Crick, a Fathers 4 Justice campaigner, climbed a 100 ft (30 m) tower crane near Tower Bridge at the start of a six-day protest dressed as Spider-Man.[33] Fearing for his safety, and that of motorists should he fall, police cordoned off the area, closing the bridge and surrounding roads and causing widespread traffic congestion across the City and east London. At the time, the building contractor Taylor Woodrow Construction Ltd. was in the midst of constructing a new office tower known as ‘K2’. The Metropolitan Police were later criticised for maintaining the closure for five days when this was not strictly necessary in the eyes of some citizens.[34][35]

On 11 May 2009, six people were trapped and injured after a lift fell 10 ft (3 m) inside the north tower.[36][37]
[edit] Popular culture
Tower Bridge model, Legoland Windsor
External videos
Lego retail model kit of Tower Bridge: the designer describes the near-scale model (over 1m long with 4287 pieces).[38]

Tower Bridge is featured – still under construction, using CGI – in the 2009 film Sherlock Holmes. One of the final scenes is played out on the bridge in the movie’s climax. The bridge is also the centre of a large action sequence in the film The Mummy Returns. Despite the bridge having been opened in 1894, it also appears in the 2010 film The Wolfman (which was set in 1891).[citation needed] Also, the bridge under construction appears in many episodes of anime Black Butler and it is featured as a place for final battle between angel Ash and a demon Sebastian.

The bridge is also featured as the home of Air Commodore Colonel William Raymond, played by Peter Cushing, in the film Biggles Adventures in Time (1986).

In the 1975 film Brannigan, John Wayne drives a car over the partially opened bridge during a car chase scene. The Spice Girls perform a similar stunt, with a bus, in the 1997 film Spiceworld. The video game, Midtown Madness 2 allows the player to perform the stunt themselves. In the 2004 film Thunderbirds, when The Hood flies the captured Thunderbird 2 to London, he navigates the craft between the bridge’s towers, the bridge operators having lifted the bascules just in time.

Source: en.wikipedia.org

My Desk

Image by camknows
I also rock the dual monitors, but I put one monitor vertical. I used to have one vertical monitor when I was in the Air Force all the time for e-mail. I find it to be a much more efficient way to sort, read, and find messages. I also like it for working on Excel spreadsheets. Left monitor is used for everything else like web surfing, taking notes, remote desktop, instant messaging, and music. I like having the light shining on the walls behind my monitors. Adds a subtle vignette. Laptop with docking station, IP phone, and gigabit switch to the right.

camknows.blogspot.com/2011/01/desks.html

Comments Off on TOWER BRIDGE HDR

Chris Christie – Whoppers on the Bridge

A few mil nice Air Force Cartoon images I found:

Chris Christie – Whoppers on the Bridge

Image by DonkeyHotey
Christopher James Christie, Chris Christie, is the Governor of New Jersey and is frequently mentioned as a possible Republican Presidential contender for 2016. Christie is embroiled in a political retribution scandal involving the George Washington Bridge and Fort Lee, New Jersey. He held a press conference to answer questions about how his staff misbehaved.

The source image for this caricature of Governor Chris Christie is a Creative Commons licensed photo from Bob Jagendorf’s Flickr photostream. The George Washington Bridge is adapted from and Creative Commons image in Brian Snelson’s Flickr photostream. The road closed sign is from and image in the public domain from FEMA via Wikimedia. The helicopters are from public domain images from the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Navy (r-l).

Picture033_28Apr05

Image by Chris_Short
In a coordinated effort involving military members and a professional photographer all senior leadership were paired up with a cartoon character.

100_1453

Image by Steven Stehling
Fuze Testing
It’s even more fun in real life than the cartoons led me to believe.

Comments Off on Chris Christie – Whoppers on the Bridge

IMG_0307

A few mil nice Military Cosplay images I found:

IMG_0307
Military Cosplay
Image by San Diego Shooter

Unknown Cosplay
Military Cosplay
Image by mashimero

Comments Off on IMG_0307

untitled-1355.jpg

Some mil cool Military Anime images:

untitled-1355.jpg
Military Anime
Image by wmamurphy

Anime Central 2008 037
Military Anime
Image by agius

TATE’S Not at Comic-Con! 7/26/14
Military Anime
Image by TATE’S
Photo archive of the TATE’S Not at Comic-Con event!
Took place on: July 26, 2014

For those unable to attend Comic-Con International in San Diego, TATE’S holds a yearly event intended to give a "taste" of the crazy con experience! These photos are from the 5th annual Not at Comic-Con event held at TATE’S.

Photo by: Dibbie Jane

TATE’S Not at Comic-Con 2014 was sponsored in part by: DC, Image, IDW, Dark Horse, Marvel, Valiant, Legendary Entertainment, Zenescope

More info on TATE’S: www.tatescomics.com

Comments Off on untitled-1355.jpg

WP Login