Image from page 212 of “A short manual of analytical chemistry, qualitative and quantitative,–inorganic and organic” (1891)

A few mil nice Air Force Cartoon images I found:

Image from page 212 of “A short manual of analytical chemistry, qualitative and quantitative,–inorganic and organic” (1891)

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Identifier: cu31924002971533
Title: A short manual of analytical chemistry, qualitative and quantitative,–inorganic and organic
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: Muter, John
Subjects: Chemistry, Analytic
Publisher: Philadelphia, P. Blakiston’s Son & Co.

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e figure. Bypouring a few drops of water into the open end of this tube a column of waterseveral centimetres high in both limbs of the tube is obtained. This servesas a manometer, and enables the operator to know when the pressure of thegas equals the atmospheric pressure. To secure a uniform temperature, thebulbs a and b are surrounded by water contained in a glass vessel. Thisvessel for holding water is merely an inverted bottle of clear glass from whichthe bottom has been removed. The handle of the stopcock d passes througha rubber stopper in the neck of the bottle. A thermometer graduated to °is placed in the water near the bulb a. The whole apparatus is supportedupon a vertical wooden stand. The absorption pipette b consists of two nearly spherical glass bulbs ofabout 300 c.c. capacity. They communicate at the bottom by means of aglass tube, 3 m.m. inside diameter, f is a two-way stopcock. The holes inthe key are drilled at right angles, so that the tube which connects with the

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Fig. 51. measuring apparatus may be put in communication either with the funnel orwith the absorption bulb. The funnel is of service in removing air from thetube which connects the measuring apparatus with the absorption pipette. Bypouring mercury or water into the funnel and turning the stopcocks ^ and c inthe proper directions all the air is readily removed, /is a rubber pump usedin transferring gas from b to a. The lower part of the pipette containsmercury, which protects the reagent from the action of the air. To measure the volume of a gas, the vessel a is filled completely with puremercury. This is easily accomplished by pouring the mercury into b, and then,after turning c until a communicates with the outside air, forcing it into a bymeans of the pump e. Any excess of mercury in b is then allowed to flow outthrough the stopcock d. When a and b are now placed into communicationthe mercury will flow from a to b, and gas will be drawn in through the stop-cock c. The volume of merc

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 19 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)

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Identifier: belltelephonevol21mag00amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]

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WARNING DISTRICT CENTER ®3 NFORMATIONCENTER OperationsBoard ^ Operotions Officers Civil Air RaidWarning Switchboard -4 CIVILIAN ACTION Other Information CentersAir FieldsInterceptor Plones in FlightAir Corps HeodqVrsOther HeodqtVsArmy, Navy, Coast GuardAnti-Aircraft Stations , To Other District Control Centers To Other WarnirjgDistrict Centers LOCAL CONTROLCENTER

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CIVILAfR DEFENSE Alarms Defense Organizations Civil Institutions: Hospitals, Schools,etc.Police and Fire Depts.UtilitiesRailroadsManufacturing Plants DAMAGE CONTROLRescue, Medical ond Decontominotion Services, Highway, Police and Fire Department$,Utilities Telephone Lines and Air Defense Only the upper portion of this diagram represents military activity. The lower part shows how the telephone serves Civilian Defense as well 19^2 Telephone Lines and Air Defense scheme. It has been brought intoexistence because, instead of necessi-tating a constant patrol in the air, itis an effective method of interceptionwhile conserving the air forces avail-able. 1 HIS plan of air defense was not de-vised over night. The idea of the ci-vilian ground observer system wasconceived a decade ago, and has beentried out, with the cooperation ofthe telephone companies, in succes-sive maneuvers since its inception.Early experiments were crude, buteach test brought improvements andrefinements.* Today, upon th

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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